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Editorial: Our future as seen by others

On Thursday evening James Corner, landscape designer, New York, once again thrilled those assembled at Pier 66 with his vision of our future. Now that the demise of the viaduct is underway the time has now come to begin serious consideration of “what next”. There is no question that there needs to be a comprehensive plan for what to do after the demise of the Viaduct. But did that plan truly require employing an out of area landscape architect, an architect devoid of local culture, local history, local knowledge and an understanding of our community? Among those assembled there was but one elected official, Sally Bagshaw. The mayor was noticeably absent from this presentation focused on the future of our city and the direction the visionary hired by the city had come to explain. The mayor did send along a message that his concern was with the much needed and more critical sea wall replacement. That deteriorating mass of concrete, fill dirt, gravel and pilings that for years has protected our city’s western boundary from the ravages of Puget Sound. Following Mr. Corners presentation there was an equally impressive presentation, or was it a sales pitch, by an equally credentialed out of area artist on our need to incorporate public art bring culture to those of us here in the west so long deprived of the philosophies of the East. The questions that were allowed following the presentation involved what are we doing for the sightless in this visionary plan of future development? Will George Benson’s street car be revived and how did the concept of adding artificial fog to the landscape come about? The question that should have been asked was in these times of economic belt tightening and budget cuts, just how much is the current contract for the conceptual beautification of or waterfront? How much has the city paid out and how much more has been authorized? We as a city do not have the resources to properly police our streets, protect our citizens, educate our children but we do have tens of millions to devote to plans for frolicking sea lions and artificially misted vistas that will never come to fruition. Yes we need a plan but at what cost? What cost not only to us the tax payers but at what cost to our children who will have to pay the final bill? http://www.king5.com/home/Latest-waterfront-plans-unveiled-1

5 Comments on "Editorial: Our future as seen by others"

  1. Who wrote this?

    Who edited this?

    Who allowed it to be published?

    Do all of the forgoing people above have any understanding of punctuation?

    Would any of them know what coherent argument was if they were mugged by one one 2nd & Bell?

    Is this the kind of dreck that I can expect from BelltownPeople?

  2. To be kind, this reads like a very rough first draft.

    Olddiver should explore the wonderful world of paragraphs.

    A reading of Strunk and White would also help.

  3. On Thursday evening James Corner, landscape designer, New York, once again thrilled those assembled at Pier 66 with his vision of our future. Now that the demise of the viaduct is underway the time has now come to begin serious consideration of “what next”. There is no question that there needs to be a comprehensive plan for what to do after the demise of the Viaduct. But did that plan truly require employing an out of area landscape architect, an architect devoid of local culture, local history, local knowledge and an understanding of our community?

    Among those assembled there was but one elected official, Sally Bagshaw. The mayor was noticeably absent from this presentation focused on the future of our city and the direction the visionary hired by the city had come to explain. The mayor did send along a message that his concern was with the much needed and more critical sea wall replacement. That deteriorating mass of concrete, fill dirt, gravel and pilings that for years has protected our city’s western boundary from the ravages of Puget Sound.

    Following Mr. Corners presentation there was an equally impressive presentation, or was it a sales pitch, by an equally credentialed out of area artist on our need to incorporate public art bring culture to those of us here in the west so long deprived of the philosophies of the East. The questions that were allowed following the presentation involved what are we doing for the sightless in this visionary plan of future development? Will George Benson’s street car be revived and how did the concept of adding artificial fog to the landscape come about? The question that should have been asked was in these times of economic belt tightening and budget cuts, just how much is the current contract for the conceptual beautification of or waterfront? How much has the city paid out and how much more has been authorized?

    We as a city do not have the resources to properly police our streets, protect our citizens, educate our children but we do have tens of millions to devote to plans for frolicking sea lions and artificially misted vistas that will never come to fruition. Yes we need a plan but at what cost? What cost not only to us the tax payers but at what cost to our children who will have to pay the final bill?

  4. The point is not where the paragraph begins or ends, it is not about punctuation, sentence structure or grammar. It’s about our priorities. On the same day our governor announced “to the bone” cuts in social services, police protection, education, criminal prosecution, work release and probation we hear that our future is to be reshaped. Reshaped not by our elected officials, not by local mandate but rather from a visionary from New York whose view of our city is through the windows of the city’s most expensive hotel.

    In these days of belt tightening and budget cuts do we truly need to have a man devoid of our local culture, history, community, or even climate feeding at our trough? Do we need to be told that what is needed is artificial fog to enhance our city scape? Do we need to pay for a vision that includes creating space for sea lions to frolic? Do we need to be shown a city scape that is of a magnitude that is truly unobtainable?

    My apologies that this old man has the computer intellect of most old men, none to less than none, but that should not be the focus. The Focus belongs on the message that our government is needlessly squandering our resources on a multimillion dollar scheme that will never come to fruition while allowing the infrastructure of our city continue to decay.

    Get involved, join the discussion, be a part of our future. The Seattle sea wall needs to be replaced lest Elliot Bay be relocated to Western Avenue. Do we need to rethink, reshape our waterfront? Yes of course. Do we need to turn our western boundary into Disney World that would be up to you? Or is it?

  5. I had some second thoughts about featuring this story. However, I felt there was enough content in terms of a recap of the discussion to make it worthwhile.

    OldDiver, thanks for being involved in your community, even if our opinions greatly differ on the value of the waterfront project. I’d encourage you to keep posting (and editing your content) on the site.

    Thanks for adding to the conversation. A reminder, anyone can post to the site. So, if you feel like you could do a better job, I’d welcome you to add your own voice to the conversation. I’d love to hear it.

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